Tag Archives: disabled persons

Disability in the workplace

There are more than 11 million disabled people in the UK, and shockingly, just 6% of those who are able to work are in employment. Even today, there is so much stigma around people with disabilities and how they fit into the workplace. According to statistics published by the charity Leonard Cheshire, 1 in 6 of us will be affected by disability at some point in our lives and for many of us, it will be the hardest thing we ever have to face.

Disability in the workplace

 

8 out of 10 people with a disability weren’t born with it – the vast majority become disabled through an injury, accident, heart attack, stroke or conditions like MS and motor neurone disease. Sadly, people living with disabilities are far less likely to be employed than non-disabled people due to a number of factors, one of them being that disabled people are around three times as likely not to hold any qualifications compared to non-disabled people.

 

Fewer than 50% of working-age disabled people are in work, compared to 75% of non-disabled people, but disabled people’s day to day living costs are 25% higher than those of non-disabled people. These figures help highlight the problems many disabled people face day to day and may give an insight into why there may still be stigma attached to disability in general, but also in the workplace.

 

This stigma can lead to individuals feeling isolated and separate from society, as they don’t see themselves moving in the same direction as their non disabled siblings and friends. It can be hard for the individual but also the families due to the available social circle decreasing drastically after leaving government funded education.

 

One problem the disabled community face is the fact that non-disabled people aren’t taught and exposed to disabilities very often. This creates ignorance and the social stigma of there being ‘us’ and ‘them’, which is something that needs to change. Things like Channel 4’s critically acclaimed show The Undateables focuses on adults with disabilities finding love. While this is not strictly to do with disabled people in the workplace, it does open up and expose the normality of disability to the general population – something that employing disabled people also does.

 

Disability in the workplace

 

Working life helps introduce everyone to a wide variety of new people. There are a few schemes, like Mencap’s Employ Me scheme and the US based company Opportunity Works, that aims to put more people with disabilities into work. These schemes provide appropriate training to develop the skills needed to get a paid job, experience in a real working environment, CV writing and interview preparation, help to learn new skills and cope with change and the schemes work with businesses employing people with a learning disability, so they can provide the right support and benefit from having a diverse workforce.

 

These kind of schemes are increasingly important to people living with a disability, as it instils so much more confidence, a strong sense of independence and initiates a bridge between people with disabilities and those without. On one hand, the person with a disability has the chance and opportunity to make friends and build relationships with people other than their carers or family members. On the other hand, research performed by Mencap states that disability employment helps teach and familiarise non disabled people with disabilities and helps change attitudes and challenge misconceptions around all forms of disabilities in the UK.

 

In a Forbes article written in 2012 by Opportunity Works’ co-founder and COO Judy Owen, she states that “Employers reported that providing [work] resulted in such benefits as retaining valuable employees, improving productivity and morale, reducing workers’ compensation and training costs, and improving company diversity.” These positives highlight that including a disabled person in the workforce increases the moral of the workforce as a whole and benefits employers to get involved in these schemes too.

 

Disability in the workplace

Disability in the workplace should be celebrated and utilised as much as possible. There are so many positives, such as improving current employee satisfaction, improving company diversity and creating new possibilities and opportunities for those who may not be able to do it for themselves. Many employers have stated that disabled employees have a higher job satisfaction, have less sick days and are late less, hardworking, friendly honest and dependable. In the individual, it helps create confidence and a sense of independence that so many people, whether they were born disabled or have become so, unfortunately lack. This gives disabled people the chance to earn their own money to be able to pay for things like holidays and days out themselves without having to rely on family members, carers or the government – a priceless feeling that you cannot get from anything else. One of Mencap’s Employ Me scheme clients stated that it “feels good to be earning money, it helps me do new things and gives me a sense of achievement”. This solidifies that including disabilities in the workplace is successful for both employer, but more importantly the employee.

 

Article written by Rosie Sanderson.

 

For any other travel advice or guidance, feel free to contact us and to learn more about our active accessible holidays, click here.

 

Clickability, the Australian website giving people with disabilities a strong consumer voice

If you wanted to find out how good that shop is down the road, there’s a bunch of apps and websites that could help you out. But what about if you have a disability and you need to find out if they have the right facilities to suits you best?

 

People with disabilities living in Victoria and New South Wales (Australia) can now do it, and all thanks to Clickability.

Clickability is a new website funded by two Australian women in Melbourne, with the intent of helping people with disabilities find the help they need. How does it work? Simple, it’s an online directory that allows local disability care and support options to be listed, rated and reviewed.

 

Jenna Moffat and Aviva Beecher Kelk both come from a background as social workers (picture: thecusp.com.au)

 

Dubbed by some a “TripAdvisor for disability support services,” the concept developed by Jenna Moffat and Aviva Beecher Kelk is impressive. Their intent is to target anyone affected by a disability and empower them with a unique chance to be able to pick and choose what service really suits them, rather than having to adapt to whatever is on offer.

 

The source of this idea comes from Beecher and Jenna’s background as social workers. They came up with the idea while after noticing that they kept having to reach out to their professional networks or use Google to find support networks for clients.

 

“We were gatekeeping so much information, I was literally calling people I did my Masters with to ask about homelessness services, for example, or domestic violence services,” and also “We just saw this huge gap there in terms of consumer rights … In this industry, that’s a gap in human rights as well,” said Aviva.

In few words, Clickability places information on disability services all in one place.

 

 

A key point about the startup is that its mission aligns with the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), a significant social welfare project for people living with disabilities being rolled out by the Australian government.

Aviva added: ‘We just saw this huge gap there in terms of consumer rights … In this industry, that’s a gap in human rights as well.’

Under the NDIS, support services will have to see people with disabilities as customers, she explained.

 

As Aviva pointed out, people with disabilities on the NDIS are in many cases expected to make their own decisions about which support service to choose. “Government money used to go to service providers to distribute services, and it’s now going to individuals to purchase the services that suit themselves,” she explained.

 

 

“Likewise, consumers have to start thinking about themselves as customers. How do I assert my customer rights? How do I articulate what I need? How do I get what I need?”

 

 

Unfortunately, in her view, the information to back up that decision-making is just not there, and it’s certainly not the kind of relevant, reliable peer-generated information that exists in other industries. That’s where Clickability comes in.

 

 

 

To list and rate services is free on Clickability, but subscribers can reply to comments and personalise their page, among other features. The next step in Clickability’s development will be to make it easier to use for visually impaired and blind people.

 

“The big thing for us is how do we make this accessible for people with intellectual disabilities?” says Aviva. “We also collect [reviews] in-person sometimes at conferences and events from people with all sorts of different access needs. It’s really important to us to find a way that everyone can have a voice.”

 

For any other travel advice or guidance, feel free to contact us and to learn more about our active accessible holidays, click here.

Newest Partner: "Disability Sanctuary"

disability suppor

Disability Sanctuary – Peer Support

Peer support can be defined as help and support that people with lived experience of disability are able to give to one another.

Our Peer Support Network is distinct as it is being provided by people who have experience of disability for people who are disabled, suffering from a condition or their carers.

How can Peer Support help?

(more…)

Newest Partner: "Disability Sanctuary"

disability suppor

Disability Sanctuary – Peer Support

Peer support can be defined as help and support that people with lived experience of disability are able to give to one another.

Our Peer Support Network is distinct as it is being provided by people who have experience of disability for people who are disabled, suffering from a condition or their carers.

How can Peer Support help?

(more…)

International Day of Persons with Disability – 3rd December, 2012

International Day of Disabled People

International Day of Disabled People

With more than one billion people in this world living with some form of disability, ‘persons with disability’ have become one of the largest groups of minorities in this world. The barriers that these people face in different aspects of participating with the society are unlimited. Societal attitudes, discrimination, legislation or policies, information and communications technology, and they physical environment are just a few examples of the types of barriers that the disabled community faces in their everyday lives. (more…)

Seable Accessible Holidays for Wheelchair Users and Blind People

Situated at the southern tip of Italy in the Mediterranean, Sicily is a diverse island of extremes. Its history stretches back more than 3,000 years and as a strategic crossroads for southern Europe, it has the legacy of various civilizations which have influenced its way of life, culture, architecture and cuisine. The island is like a vast museum, a testament to the historic Mediterranean civilizations.
(more…)

Traveling With a Disability: Top Four Tips For Making Your Journey More Comfortable

Air travel on its own is quite a nuisance but it becomes even more difficult for those people who are traveling with a disability. Disabled people often complain about not being treated right and not being provided the right facilities to accommodate their needs. Despite the fact that the EU law clearly specifies the accessibility features that airports should offer, not all airports are properly following them. So it’s best that you make some advance planning along with notifying the airline and the airport of the accommodations they will need to make for you. (more…)

Flying with a Disability: 7 Tips to Make Your Journey Easier

Air travel on its own is quite a nuisance, but it becomes even more difficult when you’re flying with a disability. Disabled people often report not being treated right and not being provided the facilities to accommodate their needs. EU law clearly specifies the accessibility features that airports should offer, however not all airports are properly following them.

The following tips will help you efficiently plan your journey and make flying with a disability easier.

 

  1. MAKE NO ASSUMPTIONS IF YOU WANT TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT

Just telling your travel agent or airline that you have a particular disability will not be sufficient. You need to clearly explain to them the assistance you will need. It’s also important that you let them know if you are traveling with someone or if you will be on your own.

If you are traveling independently, you might want to request additional support, even if it’s just asking them to keep an eye on you in case something goes wrong. Also make sure you inform the airline at least 48 hours in advance of your flight.

 

  1. KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

There are certain things that you have the right to when flying with a disability. If you have a sensory, physical or learning disability which affects your mobility, at European airports you have the right to:

 

facilities to summon assistance at designated arrival points

assistance to reach check-in

help with registration at check-in

assistance with moving through the airport, including to toilets if required

help with getting on and off the plane

free carriage of medical equipment and up to two items of mobility equipment

a briefing for you and any escort or companion on emergency procedures and the layout of the cabin

help with stowing and retrieving baggage on the plane

assistance with moving to the toilet on the plane (some planes will have an on-board wheelchair)

someone to meet you off the plane and help you reach connecting flights or the next part of your journey

 

You also have the right to travel with an assistance dog if you need one, however you will need to follow the rules for pet travel which can be found here.

 

  1. GETTING YOUR MEDIF

It is important that you check with your airline to see if you will need to show medical clearance.  If so, you will need to get a Medical Information Form (MEDIF) and have it signed by your doctor. For this form you will need to show your travel date and flight details. The airline will save your details in their records and automatically make arrangements for you the next time you travel with them.

This is an example of a MEDIF form, which you may need when flying with a disability

You may also need a license to take some medicines abroad (e.g. morphine). You can get this from your doctor but it’s best to do it well in advance.

Travel insurance is also very important flying with a disability. You can find out more about the best way to get yourself covered on our Disability Travel Insurance blog post.

 

  1. PLAN AHEAD

If you’re worried about navigating the airport, you can find the design and layout information on their websites (e.g. Heathrow). This way you can find out where important facilities such as check-in desks, accessible toilets and information desks are before you travel. This will reduce stress on the day and help you know what you’re looking for when asking for assistance.

This is an example map of terminal 3 at heathrow, it is important to check ahead and plan when flying with a disability

It can also just be handy to know what the options for food and drink are. I mean you don’t want to get a McDonald’s at check in if your favourite is Subway and there’s one in the departure lounge!

 

  1. AVOID CONNECTING FLIGHTS

Passengers that require a wheelchair to get off board are often made to wait until all the other passengers on board get off. This can be a really long wait, especially on international flights. If you want to avoid all the hassle and waiting, it’s best to book a straight flight to your destination.

On the other hand, some wheelchair passengers often find it really difficult to use aircraft lavatories. For that reason they prefer to use several short flights rather than one long flight. If that’s the case, then make sure that time between your connecting flight is at least 90 minutes so you can comfortably reach the next gate.

It’s a bit of a catch-22 (ah the joys of flying with a disability), so all you can do is pick your preference and plan accordingly.

 

  1. GETTING THROUGH SECURITY

This can be troublesome, especially for people in a wheelchair. If your chair is bigger than the scanner you will have to have a pat down, but here’s a few things to remember:

 

You shouldn’t have to leave your chair

You can have this done in private

Your wheelchair will be patted down and scanned separately

Tell people of any problems before beginning – for example if you have certain areas that are sensitive or painful that you don’t want tapped too hard

If you come across a member of staff who doesn’t appear to know what they’re doing, don’t be afraid to tell them and ask for a trained member of staff to help you.

 

  1. FLYING WITH A WHEELCHAIR

Your wheelchair will have to be checked in, but you’ll be provided with a chair to get around the airport and on to the chair. It’s also best to request an aisle seat on the plane and one as close to the entrance and exit as possible.

If you have an electric wheelchair you’ll need to check what battery type you have and the conditions the airline has on those batteries. The main issue will be if your chair or scooter has a wet acid battery. If this is the case baggage handlers will remove the battery and place it in a special container. It’s always best to check with the airline before you travel so you’re certain about what the rules are for your chair and how early you need to arrive to sort it all out.

 

We hope these tips will make flying with a disability more pleasant. If you have any other questions that might have been missed out in this blog, please let us know and we will do our best to answer them.
For further information on flying with a disability and any other travel advice or guidance, feel free to contact us. To learn more about our active accessible holidays and Seable, click here.

Experience Sicily in Your Wheelchair

Situated at the southern tip of Italy in the Mediterranean, Sicily is a diverse island of extremes. Its history stretches back more than 3,000 years and as a strategic crossroads for southern Europe, it has the legacy of various civilizations which have influenced its way of life, culture, architecture and cuisine. The island is like a vast museum, a testament to the historic Mediterranean civilizations. (more…)


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