Tag Archives: travel for the disabled

The Best Blogs About Disability

For this week’s blog we searched the web for interesting blogs about disability.

 

One of the most amazing things about blogging is that it gives people a platform to share their thoughts and connect with the world.

 

Blogs are educational and a great way for dispelling myths about the various disabilities, as through them the blogger can talk about their life and hobbies opening the doors to a world that often is very different from the one of the reader. Blogs can also function as a way to educate, to inform and to explain how to overcome certain obstacles or find priceless information.

 

So, here some of the best with a description straight from their ABOUT ME page:

 

 

Martyn Sibley

My name is Martyn Sibley. I am a regular guy who happens to have a disability called Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). This means I cannot walk, lift anything heavier than a book or shower myself. Nonetheless I run Disability Horizons, am the author of ‘Everything is Possible‘, I have a Degree in Economics & a Masters in Marketing. I love adventure travels (including an epic visit to Australia), I have great people in my life (including my soul mate), I drive my own adapted car, run my own business, have flown a plane, enjoyed skiing & SCUBA diving, and live independently on earth.

http://martynsibley.com/

 

White Cane Gamer

I’m a stay at home dad with a passion for gaming, programming and to be honest, little skill in either category. That doesn’t stop me from loving both however and wanting to improve.

I have two lovely children, one boy and one girl. The person that granted me these two lovely bundles of joy is my wife, I refer to her as Anime online, a nickname she acquired while playing Stronghold Kingdoms with me, due to her love of Anime, a game she still enjoys playing to this day.

https://whitecanegamer.com/

 

Carly Findlay

Carly Findlay is an award winning writer, speaker and appearance activist. Carly has the rare, severe skin condition called Ichthyosis. She writes on disability issues for publications including ABC, Daily Life and SBS .She was named as one of Australia’s most influential women in the 2014 Australian Financial Review and Westpac 100 Women of Influence Awards. She has appeared on ABC’s You Can’t Ask That and Cyber Hate with Tara Moss, and has been a regular on various ABC radio programs. Carly is currently writing her first book – a memoir.

http://carlyfindlay.com.au/

 

Blind Intuition

Welcome to my blog blind intuition! My name is Sarah and I am a Thirtysomething year old wife to Cameron and mother of two boys – Archer and Griffin.

In July 2015 after the birth of my son Archer, I became legally blind. During my pregnancy, it was discovered that I had benign tumours growing on my optic nerve. When Archer was nine days old, I underwent a 7 1/2 hour long brain surgery to remove the tumours;  when I woke up my world had changed, I was legally blind.

I created  Blind Intuition as a platform to process the trauma experienced from losing my vision suddenly and the impact it had on my family and myself. Blind Intuition not only tracks my progress in regaining my independence, but strives to breakdown preconceived ideas about people who are blind or have low vision. Blind Intuition is a parenting, travel,  healthy living and lifestyle blog that demonstrates how life goes on after blindness and can be embraced and lived to the fullest.

http://www.blindintuition.com/

 

Life of a Blind Girl

My name is Holly and I am 22 years old. I am a York St John University Graduate. I am a lover of music, concerts and all girly stuff. I have been blind since birth, due to a condition called Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP). My disability has made me the person I am today and has given me so many opportunities which inspired me to start this blog. The portrayal of disability can often be negative, but I believe that there are so many positives of having a disability, in my case a severe visual impairment. My visual impairment is the reason behind this blog.

https://lifeofablindgirl.com/

The Mighty

The Mighty is a community of people sharing real stories and commentary about living with disability, disease and mental illness. As well as having some great articles, it’s also a place to connect with others and has helped lots of people to feel less isolated.

https://themighty.com/

 

My Disability Matters

Dale Reardon is the Founder of My Disability Matters

I am the founder of My Disability Matters. I want MDM to be your place to come to for information and advice on issues that are important to you. It is also a place to meet new people, make friends and have some fun.

I am 47 and have been blind since the age of 17. My seeing eye dog Charlie is 9 and is my fourth dog.

For a long time I have been involved in disability advocacy. I personally believe the disability community needs a place to gather for discussion around disability issues with a community willing to share information and experiences.

https://mydisabilitymatters.club/

 

Since there are so many blogs that deserve to be shared we will publish a second part next week with more amazing stories.

 

For any other travel advice or guidance, feel free to contact us and to learn more about our active accessible holidays, click here.

Book your accessible holiday before Christmas to get a discount – Seable Holidays

Book-your-holiday-before-Christmas

When is the best time to book your holiday? Obviously it depends what sort you want, but in many cases the answer is now. If you look at a graph of when people book and research their holidays, an extraordinary change happens towards the end of December every year. Activity soars from its lowest point of the year to its highest. This remarkable shift happens as many of us, bloated and slightly bored by Christmas, with no work to do and cold grey weather outside, start to think about our summer holidays. We may not book immediately, but we certainly start searching the internet for ideas and prices.

http://www.seable.co.uk

(more…)

Traveling With a Disability: Top Four Tips For Making Your Journey More Comfortable

Air travel on its own is quite a nuisance but it becomes even more difficult for those people who are traveling with a disability. Disabled people often complain about not being treated right and not being provided the right facilities to accommodate their needs. Despite the fact that the EU law clearly specifies the accessibility features that airports should offer, not all airports are properly following them. So it’s best that you make some advance planning along with notifying the airline and the airport of the accommodations they will need to make for you. (more…)

Flying with a Disability: 7 Tips to Make Your Journey Easier

Air travel on its own is quite a nuisance, but it becomes even more difficult when you’re flying with a disability. Disabled people often report not being treated right and not being provided the facilities to accommodate their needs. EU law clearly specifies the accessibility features that airports should offer, however not all airports are properly following them.

The following tips will help you efficiently plan your journey and make flying with a disability easier.

 

  1. MAKE NO ASSUMPTIONS IF YOU WANT TO AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT

Just telling your travel agent or airline that you have a particular disability will not be sufficient. You need to clearly explain to them the assistance you will need. It’s also important that you let them know if you are traveling with someone or if you will be on your own.

If you are traveling independently, you might want to request additional support, even if it’s just asking them to keep an eye on you in case something goes wrong. Also make sure you inform the airline at least 48 hours in advance of your flight.

 

  1. KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

There are certain things that you have the right to when flying with a disability. If you have a sensory, physical or learning disability which affects your mobility, at European airports you have the right to:

 

facilities to summon assistance at designated arrival points

assistance to reach check-in

help with registration at check-in

assistance with moving through the airport, including to toilets if required

help with getting on and off the plane

free carriage of medical equipment and up to two items of mobility equipment

a briefing for you and any escort or companion on emergency procedures and the layout of the cabin

help with stowing and retrieving baggage on the plane

assistance with moving to the toilet on the plane (some planes will have an on-board wheelchair)

someone to meet you off the plane and help you reach connecting flights or the next part of your journey

 

You also have the right to travel with an assistance dog if you need one, however you will need to follow the rules for pet travel which can be found here.

 

  1. GETTING YOUR MEDIF

It is important that you check with your airline to see if you will need to show medical clearance.  If so, you will need to get a Medical Information Form (MEDIF) and have it signed by your doctor. For this form you will need to show your travel date and flight details. The airline will save your details in their records and automatically make arrangements for you the next time you travel with them.

This is an example of a MEDIF form, which you may need when flying with a disability

You may also need a license to take some medicines abroad (e.g. morphine). You can get this from your doctor but it’s best to do it well in advance.

Travel insurance is also very important flying with a disability. You can find out more about the best way to get yourself covered on our Disability Travel Insurance blog post.

 

  1. PLAN AHEAD

If you’re worried about navigating the airport, you can find the design and layout information on their websites (e.g. Heathrow). This way you can find out where important facilities such as check-in desks, accessible toilets and information desks are before you travel. This will reduce stress on the day and help you know what you’re looking for when asking for assistance.

This is an example map of terminal 3 at heathrow, it is important to check ahead and plan when flying with a disability

It can also just be handy to know what the options for food and drink are. I mean you don’t want to get a McDonald’s at check in if your favourite is Subway and there’s one in the departure lounge!

 

  1. AVOID CONNECTING FLIGHTS

Passengers that require a wheelchair to get off board are often made to wait until all the other passengers on board get off. This can be a really long wait, especially on international flights. If you want to avoid all the hassle and waiting, it’s best to book a straight flight to your destination.

On the other hand, some wheelchair passengers often find it really difficult to use aircraft lavatories. For that reason they prefer to use several short flights rather than one long flight. If that’s the case, then make sure that time between your connecting flight is at least 90 minutes so you can comfortably reach the next gate.

It’s a bit of a catch-22 (ah the joys of flying with a disability), so all you can do is pick your preference and plan accordingly.

 

  1. GETTING THROUGH SECURITY

This can be troublesome, especially for people in a wheelchair. If your chair is bigger than the scanner you will have to have a pat down, but here’s a few things to remember:

 

You shouldn’t have to leave your chair

You can have this done in private

Your wheelchair will be patted down and scanned separately

Tell people of any problems before beginning – for example if you have certain areas that are sensitive or painful that you don’t want tapped too hard

If you come across a member of staff who doesn’t appear to know what they’re doing, don’t be afraid to tell them and ask for a trained member of staff to help you.

 

  1. FLYING WITH A WHEELCHAIR

Your wheelchair will have to be checked in, but you’ll be provided with a chair to get around the airport and on to the chair. It’s also best to request an aisle seat on the plane and one as close to the entrance and exit as possible.

If you have an electric wheelchair you’ll need to check what battery type you have and the conditions the airline has on those batteries. The main issue will be if your chair or scooter has a wet acid battery. If this is the case baggage handlers will remove the battery and place it in a special container. It’s always best to check with the airline before you travel so you’re certain about what the rules are for your chair and how early you need to arrive to sort it all out.

 

We hope these tips will make flying with a disability more pleasant. If you have any other questions that might have been missed out in this blog, please let us know and we will do our best to answer them.
For further information on flying with a disability and any other travel advice or guidance, feel free to contact us. To learn more about our active accessible holidays and Seable, click here.


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